Should e-cigarettes be sold to non-smokers?

An adult walks into a corner shop and asks for a packet of cigarettes. They name the brand they want and then pay for them. They walk out and light up. Does this sound like a perfectly legal activity to you? But what if the person who bought the cigarettes had never smoked before? Do you think the shopkeeper should have asked beforehand and refused to sell them cigarettes if they were going to smoke them for the first time?  Continue reading

Freedom to Vape responds to Royal Society for Public Health report on vape shops

If you have something to say, then say it. If you don't, keep your mouth shut. There's no point in trying to invent news. If you do, it will be obvious to everyone that that is what you are doing. If only the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) thought this way.  The RSPH "report" published yesterday claimed that almost nine out of ten vape shops (87 per cent, to be precise) sell vaping products to non-smokers. This, RSPH said, breaks the Independent British Vape Trade Association's (IBVTA) code of conduct, which says: Continue reading

There are times when you have to state the bleeding obvious

A new study has found that "regulations on electronic cigarettes may impact their effectiveness as a smoking cessation tool". Tell me something I don't know. The EU's Tobacco Products Directive has created reams of paperwork that make the production of some e-liquids uneconomical. Reducing the maximum size of e-liquid bottles to a measly 10 ml, means e-liquid is going to be more expensive. It should go without saying that if more burdens are placed on an industry, the less competitive it is going to be. If products start costing more, fewer people are going to buy them. In the case of e-cigarettes this means their effectiveness as a smoking cessation tool is going to be weakened.  As this new study published in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research highlights, those countries that are actively hostile towards vaping and vapers have a lower take-up. As I have said in the title of this post, there are times when you have to state the bleeding obvious.  Continue reading

Parents – not the state – should be responsible for their children

Today the Supreme Court ruled that parents can be prosecuted for taking their children out of school without permission. Commenting on this decision, Rory Broomfield, Director of The Freedom Association, said: Continue reading

The Great Repeal Bill should do what it says on the tin

On the first day, the Prime Minister launched the Brexit process. On the second day, she left it to David Davis to explain the Great Repeal Bill. As the fictional Sir Humphrey Appleby once said in an episode of Yes Minister, “I explained that we are calling the White Paper Open Government because you always dispose of the difficult bit in the title. It does less harm there than on the statute books. It is the law of Inverse Relevance: the less you intend to do about something, the more you have to keep talking about it.” Continue reading