Long live the cause of freedom! God save the King!

From Andrew Allison, Head of Campaigns On 8th May 1945, Sir Winston Churchill took to the airwaves, announced that Nazi Germany had signed an unconditional surrender, and declared Victory in Europe Day. Rather than me quoting from one of the most famous speeches in history, click on the image below to hear the great man for yourself.  Continue reading

Face masks: Who is right? The U.K. or South Korea?

From Andrew Allison, Head of Campaigns  The number of deaths from COVID-19 in South Korea, at the time of writing, is 246. Compare that with over 21,000 deaths in U.K. hospitals alone. And although it is thought that we have reached the peak of the current outbreak, there are still over 500 people a day dying in our hospitals, with additional deaths in care homes. So how did South Korea do it? This article in The Guardian gives us an explanation: “By the time the World Health Organization issued its plea in mid-March for countries to “test, test, test”, South Korea had spent weeks doing just that, quickly developing the capability to test an average of 12,000 people – and sometimes as many as 20,000 – a day at hundreds of drive-through and walk-in testing centres. The mobile centres conducted the tests free of charge within 10 minutes, with the results were [sic] sent to people’s phones within 24 hours. By mid-March more than 270,000 people had been tested.” Continue reading

Interpreting lockdown law with discretion is best for both police and public

The following article by Andrew Allison, Head of Campaigns, was published on Brexit-Watch.org's website yesterday.  I APPRECIATE that the Police have a difficult job to do. There are plenty of idiots out there who at normal times feel that the law doesn’t apply to them. They don’t change their behaviour just because we are in the grip of a pandemic. The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020, to give it its full title, is emergency legislation. The Police would have had very little input into the drafting of it, and have been left with the task of enforcing the new powers that they have been given. But although the vast majority of officers have policed using 'The 4 E's’: Engage, Explain, Encourage, Enforce, there have been some examples of the Police being over-zealous to say the least. Click HERE to read more

How did we get into this mess and how do we get out of it?

The following is a guest post by Tomaž Slivnik. He grew up in communist Yugoslavia. After his visits to the USA in the 1980s, his dream of living in the free world and working with computers came true when he got to study and complete his MA, MMath and PhD at Trinity College, Cambridge. He was a postdoc and an assistant professor and spent time at universities in the UK, USA, Australia & Singapore before becoming a technology entrepreneur and then an active angel investor. He is an investor in many technology startups and a member of the board of Cambridge Angels. Quarantine. The idea that those with contagious diseases should be kept away from those who are healthy dates back at least to the Biblical book of Leviticus, written in the seventh century BC. During the bubonic plague outbreak of 1665-1666, the inhabitants of the village of Eyam, infected with the plague, quarantined themselves, in an act of self-sacrifice, in order to stop the spread of the plague to neighbouring towns and villages. Continue reading

The UK lockdown is now doing more harm than good - it is time to end it

The following is a guest post by David Kurten, a Brexit Alliance London Assembly Member. The coronavirus lockdown in the United Kingdom began at the end of the third week of March. This was after a series of U-turns by the government, which had previously adopted a light touch approach which it said was guided by science. In the first half of March, the government and their advisors announced that schools should stay open because there was very little chance of the virus being widely transmitted by children. London’s Mayor Sadiq Khan stated that there was no risk of catching the virus on a train or a bus. We were also told that gathering in large numbers outdoors would not spread the virus so the Cheltenham Festival could go ahead. Pubs, restaurants and cafes remained open. Continue reading