Orwell was not providing a blueprint. He was issuing a warning. If we do not heed that warning, our country will change forever.

I woke up this morning to the news that Sir Winston Churchill’s statue in Parliament Square had been boarded up overnight. I also saw an image of the Cenotaph partially covered.  Churchill had racist views. But so did the vast majority of people at that time. We have moved on. We rightly don’t think like that anymore. Churchill is not commemorated because of those views. He is commemorated because he led this country to victory in its greatest hour of need. He is regarded as the greatest Briton, and rightly so.  Continue reading

When you protest you must obey the law. Sadiq Khan must step up to the plate

Andrew Allison, Head of Campaigns The death of George Floyd in Minneapolis has horrified the world. Derek Chauvin, the police officer who pinned him down with his knee on his neck, despite Floyd clearly telling him that he could not breathe, cannot be justified, and it is correct that Chauvin and his three former colleagues are prosecuted. But that did not justify the scenes we witnessed in central London yesterday.  I was genuinely shocked when I saw a picture of the protest in Hyde Park yesterday afternoon. We still have a right to protest; of course we do, but during the current restrictions we have to protest in a way that does not spread COVID-19. This begs the question: why were so many people allowed to congregate breaking social distancing guidelines?  Continue reading

Long live the cause of freedom! God save the King!

From Andrew Allison, Head of Campaigns On 8th May 1945, Sir Winston Churchill took to the airwaves, announced that Nazi Germany had signed an unconditional surrender, and declared Victory in Europe Day. Rather than me quoting from one of the most famous speeches in history, click on the image below to hear the great man for yourself.  Continue reading

Face masks: Who is right? The U.K. or South Korea?

From Andrew Allison, Head of Campaigns  The number of deaths from COVID-19 in South Korea, at the time of writing, is 246. Compare that with over 21,000 deaths in U.K. hospitals alone. And although it is thought that we have reached the peak of the current outbreak, there are still over 500 people a day dying in our hospitals, with additional deaths in care homes. So how did South Korea do it? This article in The Guardian gives us an explanation: “By the time the World Health Organization issued its plea in mid-March for countries to “test, test, test”, South Korea had spent weeks doing just that, quickly developing the capability to test an average of 12,000 people – and sometimes as many as 20,000 – a day at hundreds of drive-through and walk-in testing centres. The mobile centres conducted the tests free of charge within 10 minutes, with the results were [sic] sent to people’s phones within 24 hours. By mid-March more than 270,000 people had been tested.” Continue reading

Interpreting lockdown law with discretion is best for both police and public

The following article by Andrew Allison, Head of Campaigns, was published on Brexit-Watch.org's website yesterday.  I APPRECIATE that the Police have a difficult job to do. There are plenty of idiots out there who at normal times feel that the law doesn’t apply to them. They don’t change their behaviour just because we are in the grip of a pandemic. The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020, to give it its full title, is emergency legislation. The Police would have had very little input into the drafting of it, and have been left with the task of enforcing the new powers that they have been given. But although the vast majority of officers have policed using 'The 4 E's’: Engage, Explain, Encourage, Enforce, there have been some examples of the Police being over-zealous to say the least. Click HERE to read more