RT hires studios from the BBC

I didn't spot this in The Times last week, otherwise I would have written about it sooner. Here's an excerpt: 'The BBC is making money by hiring out its studios to RT, the television channel controlled by Moscow. The state-owned network has been described by US intelligence officials as “the Kremlin’s principal international propaganda outlet”. Continue reading

If the BBC wants iPlayer to dominate the market, end the licence fee

The BBC dominates just about every market it enters, often at the expense of smaller companies. Now the BBC wants its iPlayer to dominate the the online TV market. It wants to compete against Netflix and Amazon.  Lord Hall, the Beeb's director general, has said that he wants the BBC to become "“the number one online TV service in the face of fierce competition”. The competition he is talking about derive their income from subscription and advertising. But of course, what he doesn't want is an end to the compulsory telly tax that gives the BBC the cash to embark on this expansionist plan.  Continue reading

Talk Is Not Cheap

The following is a guest post by the Rev Dr Peter Mullen, Hon. Chaplain of The Freedom Association.  It’s not a good idea to talk a lot, for by so doing you give too much away. By talking at length, we reveal what matters most to us: our interests, preoccupations, aspirations and fears. It’s simple: what you choose to talk about lets your listeners know who you really are, your most serious concerns, your principles and priorities. Continue reading

BBC EU bias ignored in the Lords

Lord Pearson of Rannoch, a Freedom Association Council member, asked the following question in the House of Lords yesterday: "To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the Civitas publication The Brussels Broadcasting Corporation? and of the BBC's coverage of Brexit, set against its new Charter and guidelines." (Click here to read the report) The reply he received from Lord Aston of Hyde, a junior minister in the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), was, as Lord Pearson said after hearing his response, bland: Continue reading